B. M. Wagar

Entrepreneur & Product Development Professional

Experienced product development professional with a passion for growth oriented product development, user focused decision making, and goal based execution. Extensive experience with full-cycle product development, ranging from early stage product strategy to iterative agile development. Process driven, focusing on extracting stakeholder and user need, conducting industry based product strategy, and optimizing team's execution efficiency.

WORK EXPERIENCE

WHAT I'M DOING:

PM - Emerging Technologies, McKinsey New Ventures

Founder, Troy Product Community

Advisor, OysterLabs

WHAT I DID:

Product Development, OysterLabs

Product & Monetization, Babelverse

Financial Analyst - Goldman Sachs - Ayco 

Financial Analysis Intern, Merrill Lynch

Product Management Philosophy

Goal Driven

Develop clear understanding of the business objectives at the beginning of the project or foundation of the product, and fostering that continued emphasis on the goal is critical.  Allowing that goal to shape the product vision and  guide product decisions is the only responsible way to build and monetize technology.

Passion FOR Process

Building process systems that empower the product team to love what they do and collaborate with their peers to build scalable technology allows the product to empower the user.  Well-oiled machines improve processes as people and situations evolve optimizes efficiency.

User FocusED

Digital products should empower the user, so I drive teams to build empathy with the user and making their voice the forefront of product development. Ignorance of market research and customer development, as well as decoupling the user from the pre and post-code portions of the agile process is detrimental to success.

Empowered Teams

Build product teams with high quality tech talent, fostering  an environment in which collaboration and problem solving is driving execution. Optimizing their effectiveness and driving efficient collaboration. Empowerment = good. Micromanagement = bad.